Simply Stated by Sara Jacobovici

Synchronicity leads me to the same theme again and again.

Today morning, I wrote a microtale on the Dragonition Writing Prompt

writing-prompt-dragonition-237

The story was titled Fundamentals.

In the evening, I am pleasantly surprised to see an ongoing discussion on LinkedIn take the form of a wonderful blog by Sara Jacobovici

I share the link here for readers

Simply Stated

Highlights

Dr. Ali produced the following bridge, a paradox:

“[I]intellectualism that leads us far from understanding.” – Ali Anani

This paradox opened my eyes to seeing that what should bring us closer to understanding can, at times, distance us from it. The question then is; what prevents us from acquiring understanding in spite of us processing things intellectually? I went back to my comments and found the following answers:

1. We need to break things down to intellectually understand how things work. Yes, it’s practical but we lose the trust of our ability to take in the whole. By not being able to take in the whole as a result of reducing things to their parts, and then seeing and knowing only those parts, our intellectual ability to understand the original whole is lost.

2. It all comes down to meaning. In my process of gathering information and knowledge through my intellectual process, I shouldn’t dismiss the simplicity of the nature of the results of that process; I can achieve a simple understanding in the complexity; I can still be in the complexity but stay open to perceiving its simple meaning.

In an exchange, Reena Saxena brought my attention to a link posted by Ajay Singh Pathania. In it Jason Kottke writes:

“Feynman was well known for simple explanations of scientific concepts that result in a deeper understanding of the subject matter…”

And then, the post brought my intellectual journey to a close with the following words:

“What I cannot create, I do not understand.”

Simply stated, we tend to lose sight of the fact that, developmentally speaking, we are creative beings first. Later, we learn how to think.

 

 

 

 

 

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